Feedback – BTS

feed·back Final Project for Time Based Art: Media Arts, 1341. /ˈfēdˌbak/ noun noun: feedback 1. information about reactions to a product, a person’s performance of a task, etc. which is used as a basis for improvement. synonyms: response, reaction, comment,…

Feedback - BTS

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feed·back
Final Project for Time Based Art: Media Arts, 1341.
/ˈfēdˌbak/
noun
noun: feedback
1.
information about reactions to a product, a person’s performance of a task, etc. which is used as a basis for improvement.
synonyms: response, reaction, comment, report; More
2.
the modification or control of a process or system by its results or effects, e.g., in a biochemical pathway or behavioural response.
3.
the return of a fraction of the output signal from an amplifier, microphone, or other device to the input of the same device; sound distortion produced by this.

“Feedback” is a live stream installation at 100 Laurier in the Media Arts Gallery, and therefore because it is live, the documentation video is not necessarily adequate documentation. But it is quite fun all the same.
The video examines the unfolding thought process and work behind the construction of Feedback, along with many anecdotes that I formerly didn’t consider pertinent to the final product. Though it’s clear in the final result exactly how pertinent the earlier moments of the process were, the colours, the sweetest-old-grandma-canon camera, the smaller versions of tech and their various limitations. It’s interesting in this way to consider the original idea that drove the project: perception.

The hallway is a liminal space, or: a space that only exists for you pass through. In this work I explore the liminality of perception and the relationship technology and media art have in our cognizance and understanding of ourselves, others, how others perceive us, and the way any perception, in its limitations, can have effects that ripple.

Perception is a fragile thing, on both ends it can be insufficient or inaccurate, and that issue can teach us things, even though they may be imperfect things, prone to change.
The space appears to interact, too. With the smallest movement or even the smallest change of light, it reacts – it breathes. These actions in the space create a domino effect of light, as if to remind us that we are capable of creating light with even the smallest gestures, and by creating light, we can illuminate details we might have others missed.
The cameras themselves sit opposite to each other, and interact with one another, the seat of the webcam on the right projects to the left wall, and vice versa, just as our brain interacts with information.
Only in sitting in the space did it occur to me that the project had reached completion. Only by sitting with quiet, intent observation did the light, movement, and space resolve.
Sitting in a liminal space.

My sincerest thanks to all involved in this creation.
Kimberley Eady

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